Rare audio recording of Ernest Hemingway discussing his novel “Across the River and into the Trees”

Portrait of Ernest Hemingway in Paris 1924

Hey all. Yesterday’s post of a voice recording of F. Scott Fitzgerald reading Keats led me down the rabbit hole of recordings of other great writers of the period, none of whom I’ve actually heard speak. Reading their work, and seeing depictions of them in popular culture, forms an idea of their voice in your head, which is often vastly different from how they actually spoke. To that end, today I went in search of Ernest Hemingway and found this great clip. I’m a little confused about it and couldn’t find much information, but in it he talks about his novel Across the River and into the Trees.

A commentor on the video posted the following: “This recording comes from the Great Voices Audio Collection. 1993. Cassettes. From the box and insert the following info explains the recording. Ernest Hemingway Nobel Prize acceptance speech. In Harry’s Bar In Venice and Other Of His Writings. Digitally remastered in 1993. From the insert: “One of Hemingway’s deadliest enemies was The Microphone… but over the years, under special circumstances, Ernest did record a few things for me on an old Webster wire recorder that he kept in his finca in Cuba, and on a transistorized pocket recorder called a Midgetape, which we took on our travels. these wires and tapes, imperfect as they are, are virtually the only record we have of his voice. The one exception is his acceptance of the Nobel prize recorded in Havana.” – A.E. Hotchner.”

If anyone knows more about this clip, please comment below. Regardless of the story behind the clip, it’s great to hear his voice!

2 thoughts on “Rare audio recording of Ernest Hemingway discussing his novel “Across the River and into the Trees”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: