Cover Art Collage – This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

F. Scott Fitzgerald in 1921

Hey everyone, welcome to another edition of Cover Art Collage. Today we’re going to be taking a look at some of the different artwork which has been used for the cover of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s first novel, This Side of Paradise.

First published in 1920, This Side of Paradise skyrocketed Fitzgerald to fame as a voice of his generation. The story follows a fictionalized version of Fitzgerald under the guise of Amory Blaine as he grows from young child to Princeton alumnus and beyond.

Here is a collection of some of the art which has been used to portray this novel:

This Side of Paradise Collage

There are some interesting different takes on cover art here. As the story revolves almost exclusively around Amory and his coming-of-age, to me the most natural of cover art would be with emphasis on this idea of “man alone,” which indeed is what we see in several of these. However, the original artwork and the Barnes & Noble edition both emphasize a romantic looking couple, with deference actually given to the woman. Going beyond this is the Penguin Classics edition, which only shows a wistful woman basking in the moonlight, which points to the idea of romance, but is not particularly reflective of the story itself in my eyes. And then you have the ones which point to a black-and-white photo of a group of young people, choosing to put the focus on the idea of this as a “college novel” of “wild youth.”

As usual, all of these are interesting choices, and while I love the original artwork, I prefer the ones which show a man alone, it simply seems more in tune with the book itself, which is one of my favorites.

What you all think? Any preferences?

Until next time enjoy the rest of your weekend and happy reading!

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