Kenneth Burke

Kenneth Duva Burke (May 5, 1897–November 19, 1993) was an American literary critic and theorist, poet, essayist, and novelist. He is most well-known for his works A Rhetoric of Motives and A Grammar of Motives.1

Works

  • Counter-Statement (1931)
  • “Towards a Better Life” (1932)
  • Permanence and Change (1935)
  • Attitudes Toward History (1937)
  • The Rhetoric of Hitler’s “Battle” (1939)
  • Philosophy of Literary Form (1941)
  • A Grammar of Motives (1945)
  • A Rhetoric of Motives (1950)
  • Book of Moments (1955)
  • Linguistic Approaches to Problems of Education (1955)
  • The Rhetoric of Religion (1961)
  • Language As Symbolic Action (1966)
  • Collected Poems 1915-1967 (1968)
  • Dramatism and Development (1972)
  • Here and Elsewhere (2005)
  • Late Poems: 1968-1993 (2005)
  • Essays Toward a Symbolic of Motives (2006)
  • Kenneth Burke on Shakespeare (2007)

See also

External Links

References

1. “Kenneth Burke.” Encyclopedia Britannica. Accessed March 7, 2021.

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