Quotes from letters between F. Scott Fitzgerald and Edmund Wilson

The following quotes from letters between F. Scott Fitzgerald and Edmund Wilson are extracted from The Letters of F. Scott Fitzgerald (1963).

“I sent twelve poems to magazines yesterday. If I get them all back I’m going to give up poetry and turn to prose.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, September 26, 1917

“Do you realize that Shaw is 61, Wells 51, Chesterton 41, Leslie 31 and I 21? (Too bad I haven’t a better man for 31. I can hear your addition to this remark.)” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, Fall 1917

“I remind myself lately of Pendennis, Sentimental Tommy (who was not sentimental and whom Barrie never understood), Michael Fane, Maurice Avery and Guy Hazlewood.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, Fall 1917

“God! How I miss my youth – that’s only relative of course but already lines are beginning to coarsen in other people and that’s the sure sign. I don’t think you ever realized at Princeton the childlike simplicity that lay behind all my petty sophistication and my lack of a real sense of honor.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, January 10, 1918

“Since I last saw you I’ve tried to get married and then tried to drink myself to death but foiled, as have been so many good men, by the sex and the state I have returned to literature” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, August 15, 1919

“As a matter of fact I have never written a line of any kind while I was under the glow of so much as a single cocktail and tho my parties have been many it’s been their spectacularity rather than their frequency which has built up the usual “dope-fiend” story.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, January 1922

“I’m filled with disgust for Americans in general after two weeks’ sight of the ones in Paris – these preposterous, pushing women and girls who will assume that you have any personal interest in them, who have all (so they say) read James Joyce and who simply adore Mencken.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, Spring 1925

“If I had anything to do with creating the manners of the contemporary American girl I certainly made a botch of the job.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, Spring 1925

“… with Ernest I seem to have reached a state where when we drink together I half bait, half truckle to him; and as for bringing up the butcher boy matter – my God! making trouble between friends is the last thing I have ever thought myself capable of. Anyhow, plenty of egotism for the moment.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, March 1933

“In spite of the fact that we always approach material in different ways there is some fast-guessing quality that, for me, links us now in the work of the intellect. Always the overtone and the understatement.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, September 7, 1934

“It was fun when we all believed the same things. It was more fun to think that we were all going to die together or live together, and none of us anticipated this great loneliness, where one has dedicated his remnants to imaginative fiction and another his slowly dissolving trunk to the Human Idea.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, September 7, 1934

“I am still the ignoramus that you and John Bishop wrote about at Princeton. Though my idea is now, to learn about a new life from Louis B. Mayer who promises to teach me all about things if he ever gets around to it.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, May 16, 1939

“I think my novel is good. I’ve written it with difficulty. It is completely upstream in mood and will get a certain amount of abuse but is first hand and I’m trying a little harder than I ever have to be exact and honest emotionally. I honestly hoped somebody else would write it but nobody seems to be going to.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald to Edmund Wilson, November 25, 1940

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